URLs of wisdom – W.T.Facebook edition – April 2018

This is a special instalment of the URLs of wisdom in which I round up some new and some not-so-new links about privacy, fake news and the business of community as relates to Facebook. If you have additional reading material on these topics to recommend, please add it as a comment.

 

When you add a feature that is really a bug…
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/cambodia4kidsorg/2825261107/

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URLs of wisdom – silencing, story and speaking up edition – March 2018

Having diverse voices able to safely express their input and for it be received respectfully is vital to the functioning of teams, groups and communities – including those online and in science. This is a special instalment of the URLs of wisdom in which I round up some new and some not-so-new links that explore silencing, story and speaking up. If you have additional reading material on these topics to recommend, please add it as a comment.

“I’m a unique bird and I will not be deterred from making my song heard.”
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnfish/3932308358/

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URLs of wisdom – resilience and self-care edition – August 2017

URLs of wisdom is a round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology. This week is a special instalment of the URLS of wisdom in which I round up some links that explore self-care and the challenges of maintaining resilience in our online interactions.

From social in silico 

It’s been a few weeks since the last URLs of wisdom. Here’s what’s new on the blog since then.

 

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URLs of wisdom – 16th July 2017

URLs of wisdom is a round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology. 

From social in silico 

Recently I’ve shared the following new posts:

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URLs of wisdom – June 30th 2017

URLs of wisdom is a round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology. There’s been a big gap since the last one, but the URLs are back!

From social in silico 

This week I’ve shared the following new posts:

  • Thoughts about the change agent traits of community managers.
  • A new skills model which helps to accommodate people in roles of social leadership who don’t have binary skills but rather hold both forms of a skill in tension in a skills web.
  • Part one of a series  considering the types of communities we find within science – first up, professional associations and “infrastructure” organisations.
  • 10 questions to ask before starting a collaborative project.

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URLs of wisdom (30th May 2015)

URLs of wisdom is a weekly round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology. There’s been a bit of gap since the last post due to lots of work travel but things should pick up again from here 🙂

Social network analysis

Behaviour

  • Online discussion forums good for well-being – “Often we browse forums just hoping to find answers to our questions. In fact, as well as finding answers, our study showed users often discover that forums are a source of great support, especially those seeking information about more stigmatising conditions. Moreover, we found that users of both forum types who engaged more with other forum users showed a greater willingness to get involved in offline activities related to the forum, such as volunteering, donating or campaigning.”
  • Trust erodes over time in the online world – A look at the Couchsurfing website: The findings revealed, the researchers wrote, an interesting mechanism at the root of interpersonal trust: “The accumulation of ratings about users (whether guests or hosts) had a double-edged effect on trust and relationships: it made relationships easier to establish initially but it also weakened them after a certain threshold.”

Academia online 

Social media/networks/data sharing

  • A Facebook for science? Brett Buttliere describes how it might look: “I believe science would benefit from having one online platform for people to do basically all aspects of science in, including review. Such a system would probably involve: a user friendly profile, a feed of (science) stories based upon previous viewing behavior, the ability for users to like, comment, and interact with content (e.g., papers, datasets, materials) within the system, and some sort of impact metrics that quantify the individual’s contribution into the system; basically, something like a Facebook or Twitter for science.”
  • What should a modern scientific infrastructure look like? Bjoern Brembs describes his vision for the future: “As an author, I want my data to be taken care of by my institution: I want to install their client to make sure every piece of data I put on my ‘data’ drive will automatically be placed in a data repository with unique identifiers. The default setting for my repository may be open and a CC0 license, or set manually to any level of secrecy I’m allowed to or intend. The same ought to be a matter of course for the software we write. In today’s day and age, institutions should provide an infrastructure that makes version-controlled software development and publishing seamless and effortless.”
  • Citation boost or bad data? A closer look at a recent claim by Academia.edu that using the site causes a major boost in citations of papers uploaded there. – “Compared to a control group of papers, selected at random from the same journals and same years as the Academia.edu group, their analysis finds a positive association between free access and article citations that grows over time. This association should not be surprising, given a decade and a half of similarly reported results. What IS surprising about their findings was that having one’s paper freely available from other freely accessible locations only boosted a paper’s citations by just 3%.”
  • Which online tools do you use? A new survey to look at scientific workflows.
  • Maintaining relationships with readers as they cross affiliations“Researchers’ multiple and changing institutional affiliations create tangible challenges, both for the researchers themselves and for scholarly publishers as well. While an ideal solution may not be possible, it is worth contemplating a vision that would address these challenges.”

Outreach/public engagement

 Communities 

  • Does your online community feel like Twitter pre-2009? It should.  – “Six years ago, Twitter was a much more intimate place. In explaining it to people, I often used the “dinner party” analogy – “It’s like a dinner party – you go in and you may only know one person, but you talk to them and meet their friends, and your network begins to grow.”

Social media developments

  • Medium is not a publishing tool – Medium introduced shared highlights on posts. Interesting to see annotation as a kind of “social layer” on top of content (framed in this post as features that “create network value”).

Just for fun

Ask the emojis…

URLs of wisdom (31st March)

URLs of wisdom is a weekly round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology.

Social network analysis

Behaviour

  • Is email one of the last private spaces online? “This realm of asynchronous communication is akin to our living rooms. They’re private spaces that others are invited into. You select who enters your inbox, whether that’s by opting-in for a newsletter or sharing your email address with a friend or colleague.”
  • The psychology of mass government surveillance“Just how accepting are people of surveillance in the first place? In short, not very. Across all 13 countries, there was no majority support for surveillance – only 26% of people, overall, agreed that the government should monitor the communications and Internet activity of its own citizens, while a similar number (29%) felt their government should monitor overseas citizens.”

Academia online 

  • What do members want from scholarly societies? A preliminary look at a recent survey of 14, 000 people evenly spread across 3 age ranges. “The top reason for renewing [society membership] (41%) is feeling connected to the community” but there’s more that can be done in terms of marketing: “15% of non-member respondents said they haven’t joined a society because they haven’t been invited! A further 12% (each) responded that “it never occurred to me to join one” or “I don’t know what’s available in my field””

Social media/networks/data sharing

 Communities 

Working with technology

  • Personalizing discovery without sacrificing serendipity – “One approach would be to apply usage data as a mechanism to gauge the importance or notoriety of an individual item, allowing for materials to be discovered from further afield only insofar as they were relatively important….This type of approach underscores the importance of controlling, or at least having access to, data not only about researchers’ interests and practices, but also about research materials and how they are used.”

Social media developments

Just for fun

A taxonomy of Twitter users

The followback Twitter user  - image by Matthew Partridge of ErrantScience.com

The followback Twitter user – image by Matthew Partridge of ErrantScience.com