Reading for Leading #6: Adjust your lenses

Adjust your lenses

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

How does the lens you choose to use affect the picture that you see?
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sammcox/35182691946/

 

Bolman and Deal have identified 4 lenses or frames that you can use to examine your organisation, especially if you’re considering implementing a new initiative or other large-scale change:

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URLs of wisdom – resilience and self-care edition – August 2017

URLs of wisdom is a round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology. This week is a special instalment of the URLS of wisdom in which I round up some links that explore self-care and the challenges of maintaining resilience in our online interactions.

From social in silico 

It’s been a few weeks since the last URLs of wisdom. Here’s what’s new on the blog since then.

 

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Considering Community: The Connect-Align-Produce network model for social-impact networks

Social in silico includes a series of occasional posts focused on community management tips and related information. I’m tagging these Considering Community and you can find all the posts in the series here

For regular online communities, such as those hosted by an organisation, we looked at the four stage model of the community lifecycle described in Rich Millington’s “Buzzing Communities”. Last week, we considered a different type of community – a social-impact network where the emphasis is on group members working together for a social good. In “Connecting to Change the World”, the authors discuss three different stages of a social-impact network – and how it’s possible to transition between them. Let’s consider this connect-align-produce model.

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5 books that have influenced how I think about online interactions

In a series of 3 posts, I’m sharing some books that I’ve found useful on the topics of community management, online interactions, and leadership and team culture. In this post, I recommend 5 books that cover various aspects of how we behave online from different types of interactions to how structures influence our activities and more.

 

1. “It’s complicated” by danah boyd

I really enjoyed danah boyd’s dissection of the various beliefs about how teenagers use social networks – indeed, it was probably my favourite book of 2014. But it’s not simply an internet explainer/debunking of scare stories for the worried parent. Yes, each chapter addresses a topic of potential misunderstanding – from online identity, to privacy, to the naive belief that the internet is a great leveller. But, boyd frames many of her arguments in relation to the 4 affordances of online networks – the behaviours that the various online tools make possible.  I enjoyed considering persistence, visibility, searchability and spreadability as key factors in sharing content online – and have started a series of my own musings about these affordances.

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Reading for Leading #5: 5 questions for your team

5 questions for your team

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Hand over the mic to your team members to learn more about them and how the team works.
Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/7953061@N02/14472397513/

As leaders or managers we can make the mistake  of thinking that we’re supposed to have all the answers. Not only is this generally unlikely to be true, but especially when we start a new role we’re likely to be missing a lot of information about the current set up – and our team’s attitudes towards it.

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Bigger bytes of multimedia – July/August 2017

Looking for a longer form visit into the world of people, science and technology? Here are some of my favourite bigger bytes of multimedia this month.

Listen

“The Internet is used for the good, bad, and ugly. It magnifies the good, bad, and ugly. And I always come back to that. I still believe that that’s true. It’s this moment where we can see these tools be used to create such openings, to create such opportunities, to imagine different futures. But they can also be used to reify all sorts of existing prejudices and inequities.”

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Considering Community: What’s a social-impact network?

Social in silico includes a series of occasional posts focused on community management tips and related information. I’m tagging these Considering Community and you can find all the posts in the series here.

What’s a social-impact network?

This week I’ve been reading “Connecting to change the world” by Peter Plastrik, Madeleine Taylor and John Cleveland. It’s a focused, practical guide to building a very specific type of community – a social-impact network.

Whereas the word community has now been adopted for somewhat ambiguous use in a wide variety of scenarios involving groups of people, a social-impact network has a clear definition. It’s a collection of collaborators who are working together in some way to address a complex social issue.

Social-impact networks are self-organising – with decision-making distributed across the networks and with a structure that may change rapidly (such as the formation or closure of working groups).

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