Reading for leading #9: 4 traits that team members rate

4 traits that team members rate

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Does your team trust you to envision the road ahead with honesty and inspiration?

For over three decades, Kouzes and Pozner and have surveyed  and discovered what team members expect of their leaders. They’ve consistently found that the the same four traits receive more than 60% of the votes.

What employees seek in a leader that they would be willing to follow is that they are:

Honest – People want to follow others that they trust – for over 80% of people asked, this was their top requirement of a leader. Similar words that come up in this section are integrity and authenticity. Honesty matters not just so that you trust that what you’re being asked to do will have a positive outcome, but because it is tied to values and ethics. If you follow someone that you later discover to have been dishonest, you may feel that your own reputation has been damaged too.

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Reading for Leading #8: Who’s on your relationship radar?

Who’s on your relationship radar this month?

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Is there anybody out there? Time to get your relationship radar in order…
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ianto73/14598595002/

 

Radar is helpful because it gives us an evolving snapshot of the surrounding environment, forewarning us of what’s coming up, and allowing us time to prepare. It works because the radio frequency waves we send out are deflected back to us when they encounter an object in their path allowing us to calculate what’s located where. 

A relationship radar works in a similar way – allowing you to map where you stand with those you work with so that you can do any necessary relationship-building before you need to rely on someone’s support. 

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Reading for Leading #7: Before you go to speak…

Before you go to speak… 

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

If monkeys could ask questions…
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ektogamat/2687444500/

Ask yourself:

Is it true?

Is it kind?

Is it necessary?

Reading for Leading #6: Adjust your lenses

Adjust your lenses

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

How does the lens you choose to use affect the picture that you see?
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sammcox/35182691946/

 

Bolman and Deal have identified 4 lenses or frames that you can use to examine your organisation, especially if you’re considering implementing a new initiative or other large-scale change:

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Reading for Leading #5: 5 questions for your team

5 questions for your team

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Hand over the mic to your team members to learn more about them and how the team works.
Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/7953061@N02/14472397513/

As leaders or managers we can make the mistake  of thinking that we’re supposed to have all the answers. Not only is this generally unlikely to be true, but especially when we start a new role we’re likely to be missing a lot of information about the current set up – and our team’s attitudes towards it.

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Reading for Leading #4: Check-in with your calendar

Check-in with your calendar

Check-in with your calendar. Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dafnecholet/5374200948/

When you have a quiet moment, take a seat, make yourself comfortable and make sure you’re going to be undisturbed. Then open your calendar for next week. Starting with Monday, slowly read through each day, appointment by appointment, noticing how each one makes you feel.

What are you looking forward to? What fills you with dread? Are you ever double or triple-booked? Have you allowed time for lunch? Are there days that feel about right?

Our calendars reflect how we choose to spend our days. Do you feel in control of yours or as though its scheduling is down to others? What would it take for your calendar to be an ally not an obstacle to getting your work done?

Source of inspiration: Janice Marturano’s “Finding the space to lead”

Reading for Leading #3: If you feel helpless, help someone

If you feel helpless, help someone

Helping hands
Image credit: author’s own

 

Next time you feel blocked – struggling with finding the right phrase for a crucial email, frustrated by a technical issue or feeling unsupported by someone you considered an ally, instead of giving in to the feelings of disappointment, anger or resistance, what happens if you put the issue down and look for a way to offer a hand to someone else?

It could be changing the toner cartridge in the photocopier, replenishing the printer with paper, proof-reading a colleague’s latest report or reviewing a collaborator’s newest results. It doesn’t have to be a big gesture – start with something that feels manageable right now.

How does being helpful in a hopeless moment make you feel?