Considering Community: What types of community are there? (Science edition – part two)

In one of my early Considering Community posts I outlined several broad types of community – from communities of interest to communities of circumstance – and I mused on whether the different types might use online tools distinctly.

In reflecting recently on the different communities represented in the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program that I run, I realised that it’s time to dive a little deeper on this topic – considering some of the different configurations of community specifically within science. 

In this first post on the topic, I discussed professional societies for scientists and what I call infrastructure or “halo” organisations. In part two I’m going to consider research collaborations.

Putting the pieces together.
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoneysteiner/5999358838/

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Using a Facebook group for an online book club – taking part from a community manager’s perspective

This year I’m participating in an asynchronous, online book club in a private Facebook group. In this post I’m going to capture some of the logistics of how it’s working so far and some reflections on what it’s like to participate from the perspective of a community manager who’s not running the group.

One degree of separation – setting up the group

The book club was the idea of a friend who set up a private Facebook group and then posted that she was willing to invite any of her Facebook friends who were interested in taking part. So the members all know her but not necessarily anyone else in the group. We’ve a total of 18 members overall, of which 7 of us participate most months and maybe 7 have not yet joined the conversations.

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Reading for Leading #10: Two doing lists

Two doing lists 

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Maybe make sure you put those lists in a safe place? Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/drbethsnow/2346465163/

At the end of your work week, before you put work down for the weekend, try writing two lists.

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5 books that have influenced how I think about community management

In a series of 3 posts, I’m sharing some books that I’ve found useful on the topics of community management, online interactions, and leadership and team culture. In this post, I recommend 5 books that discuss community management and working effectively with groups.

1. “The art of community” by Jono Bacon

This was the book that years ago helped me to realise that I was a community manager. Jono Bacon describes what a community manager does – including the importance of good communication practices, selecting the right tools, and balancing being a member of the community while often negotiating your role as an employee representing an organization. If you’re wondering whether you’re a community manager, or are brand new to the role, this is a good place to start.

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Reading for leading #9: 4 traits that team members rate

4 traits that team members rate

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Does your team trust you to envision the road ahead with honesty and inspiration?

For over three decades, Kouzes and Pozner and have surveyed  and discovered what team members expect of their leaders. They’ve consistently found that the the same four traits receive more than 60% of the votes.

What employees seek in a leader that they would be willing to follow is that they are:

Honest – People want to follow others that they trust – for over 80% of people asked, this was their top requirement of a leader. Similar words that come up in this section are integrity and authenticity. Honesty matters not just so that you trust that what you’re being asked to do will have a positive outcome, but because it is tied to values and ethics. If you follow someone that you later discover to have been dishonest, you may feel that your own reputation has been damaged too.

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Reading for Leading #8: Who’s on your relationship radar?

Who’s on your relationship radar this month?

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

Is there anybody out there? Time to get your relationship radar in order…
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ianto73/14598595002/

 

Radar is helpful because it gives us an evolving snapshot of the surrounding environment, forewarning us of what’s coming up, and allowing us time to prepare. It works because the radio frequency waves we send out are deflected back to us when they encounter an object in their path allowing us to calculate what’s located where. 

A relationship radar works in a similar way – allowing you to map where you stand with those you work with so that you can do any necessary relationship-building before you need to rely on someone’s support. 

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Reading for Leading #7: Before you go to speak…

Before you go to speak… 

Reading for Leading is a weekly leadership tip shared every Monday morning as a pithy suggestion, question or reflection. You can find the whole series here.

If monkeys could ask questions…
Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ektogamat/2687444500/

Ask yourself:

Is it true?

Is it kind?

Is it necessary?