URLs of wisdom (January 11th 2015)

URLs of wisdom is a weekly round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology.

Behaviour

  • The Science Opinion Games: new conversations, same old voices? –“Scientific discourse, peer review, and internet conversations are often unpleasant, conflict-driven, and aggressive. Less tolerance and rewarding of that behavior could help cultivate a public science discussion space that’s more appealing across the board, but particularly to women as a group.”

Academia online 

  • Dark research: information content in many modern research papers is not easily discoverable online. PeerJ pre-print by Ross Mounce looking at indexing of research. “This research is a basic proof-of-concept which demonstrates that when searching for published scholarly content, relevant studies can remain hidden as ’Dark Research’ in poorly-indexed journals, even despite expertise-informed efforts to find the content. The technological capability to do full text indexing on all modern scholarly journal content certainly exists, it is perhaps just publisher-imposed access-restrictions on content that prevents this from happening.”

Blogging

Social media/networks

  • Scholarly communities face crucial social challenges in maintaining digital networks that can sustain participation – Great read on why social challenges matter as much as tech ones “this opportunity points toward a deeper, underlying challenge, for societies and scholars alike: building and maintaining communities that inspire and sustain participation. This is nowhere near as easy as it may sound. And it’s not just a matter of the “if you build it, they won’t necessarily come” problem; problems can creep up even when they do come.”

Outreach

  • Science in the words of Alan Alda – Interview with the namesake of the Alda Center for Communicating Science at StonyBrook University. “Listening is what lets things happen— whether that’s on stage, or in the classroom. Listening—really listening—to another person, even when you don’t agree with them, can feel dangerous, as if you are making yourself vulnerable to that other person. But that’s what allows a conversation to take place, rather than a debate.”

Science Publishing

Communities 

  • Great read by Cameron Neylon on the dangers of being defined as one thing and how this hinders interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving – “as I’ve become interested in tackling larger and more challenging problems its also become obvious that new perspectives are needed. This kind of approach needs positive, enriching filters, not negative ones, because by excluding certain streams you eliminate unfamiliar perspectives. This is why being labelled as “a scientist” generally stops me cold. It is a rejection of perspective, a rejection in my world view of an opportunity. It is bound up in a self identify of difference that uses difference as a way to filter and exclude – something that for me is in opposition to scholarship that is of most interest.”

Upcoming events 

Resources

Just for fun

Time for Clippy to make a comeback?

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URLs of wisdom (23rd November)

URLs of wisdom is a weekly round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology.

Behaviour

  • Why do we need to have so many meetings? – asks Krystal D’Costa “Participating or being invited to participate reaffirms our place in the group. It solidifies our role and communicates our value to other group members. One of the reasons shyness has long been viewed as a negative personality trait is because it prevents the individual from participating, and participation is a type of social currency: the more people see our participation, the more important we become.”
  • Lonely natives – Dave White on more observations about why thinking of Internet users as digital natives (or digital immigrants) is unhelpful. “The influence of the digital is being framed here as entirely social, not technical. This, for me, is more evidence that we are becoming Postdigital, wherein the digital permeates everything so the focus shifts back to the human.”
  • Networked mortality – thinking about what happens to your digital life, including your passwords, after you die.

Academia online 

Blogging

  • Science blogs and online trolling – do below-the-line comment spaces help or hurt science communication? “…there is a real need for a nuanced discussion of online comment spaces: it is important to recognise the value and potential positive impact of such spaces, as well as their risks.”
  • Innovative science blogging – summarising research using infographics

Outreach

  • On publication and self-promotion – Liz Neeley shares some tips, and an interview, with the author of a recent paper who approached COMPASS for advice about promoting an upcoming paper “I’d get these nuts-and-bolts questions about a general recommendation and you realize, “I’m not really sure how to respond to that.” I think journalists want specific examples they can use to make their piece real. You realize during a lot of those questions you’re not the right person to be commenting on that. I’m comfortable saying things up to a certain point, but some of those very specific applications of our recommendations were challenging.”
  • Buzzfeed – a new home for research? – “Much to our surprise, that post garnered a lot of attention. ‘A lot’ is a relative term, of course, but our ’7 things’ Buzzfeed attracted about ten times as many views in the first week of its posting as a blog we put on the FHS website (albeit on a completely different topic) the week before.” [NB – “a lot of attention” was less than 700 views in a week]

Communities 

  • A conference for members of the open community, OpenCon, was held in DC last weekend. Ross Mounce has a super round-up full of useful links.
  • Round-up of the talks and related content from the CMX summit on community management.

Web/social media developments

  • Twitter is now indexes every tweet since 2006 “Since that first simple Tweet over eight years ago, hundreds of billions of Tweets have captured everyday human experiences and major historical events. Our search engine excelled at surfacing breaking news and events in real time, and our search index infrastructure reflected this strong emphasis on recency. But our long-standing goal has been to let people search through every Tweet ever published.”
  • Facebook at work “The company’s new, enterprise-focused product will be similar to the functionality of its current site, with a newsfeed, groups and messaging capability. However, it will also include collaborative tools for work on shared documents. Facebook at Work will be entirely separate from personal accounts, with no information from a user’s social profile appearing on his or her professional page, and vice versa.”
  • Facebook launches stand-alone Groups app. “the Groups app opens to a clean grid of circular Group icons. The ones you interact with most are positioned at the top of the screen. Once you enter a group, posts and images take up the full width of the screen for a more enjoyable viewing experience. As before, the option to write a post or share a photo sit at the top of the Group page.”

Digital marketing

Resources

 Upcoming events

Just for fun

  • 3D printed viruses for your Christmas tree – with money going to science outreach projects.
Contagious festive spirit! Image credit: @genegeek.

Contagious festive spirit! Image credit: @genegeek.

URLs of wisdom (19th April)

URLs of wisdom is a weekly round-up of interesting links about topics at the intersection of people, science and technology.

Network analysis 

  • How does false information spread online?  We don’t know exactly…Understanding the spread of false information online requires a better understanding of two things. First, how information spreads online; second, what we mean by false information.”

Behaviour

“Social media users engage in practices that alter their visibility to machine algorithms, including subtweeting, discussing a person’s tweets via ‘screen captures,’ and hate-linking.”

  • Aleks Krotoski’s weekly Radio 4 podcast, Digital Human, is back – this week’s episode “Voice” considers questions such as why video content will never go viral and the emotional response we get when we hear the voice of someone we know.

Academia Online

  • Three issues: privacy, trust and the challenge of managing the popular culture record in a digital age.

Communities

  • Managing change within communities – some lessons learned from Open Street Map. Great advice which includes the following key areas:
    • Work in the open
    • Do the work in small pieces
    • Overcommunicate
    • Be polite
    • Set bounds
    • Call for closure
    • Be patient
  • Video linked to from the above post – Building Compassionate Communities in Tech. How do we encourage healthy (“non-violent”) communication in online communities? How do we not react badly to the trolls?

Web/Social media developments

Resources

Just for fun

Free speech – does it mean what you think it means…?